Tag Archives: Transmission Basics

What Is A Transmission Service?

What is a Transmission Service?

What is a transmission service? What does it entail? When does your transmission need a service? How often? What are the benefits of transmission service? What will it cost you? This article will answer all these questions and more about transmission service.

How Much Does It Cost For A Transmission Service?

Many people are concerned with money first and foremost, so let’s not beat around the bush here. How much does transmission service cost? The answer to that is . . . I don’t know. It depends on the type of transmission you have, how old it is, how damaged it is, if there’s a problem with the transmission, if that problem can easily be identified, and, of course, to which transmission shop you go for your transmission service. If all you need is your fluid changed, maybe you can get your transmission serviced for under a hundred dollars. If your transmission needs to be inspected for a suspected problem, this will cost extra.

When Should A Transmission Be Serviced?

A transmission should be serviced whenever you notice a problem with your transmission. Is your transmission slipping out of gear and into neutral? Is your transmission grinding when you change gears? Are you hearing funny whirring or humming sounds? Are you seeing patches of transmission fluid underneath your vehicle after you have parked? All of these are signs that your transmission needs to be serviced.

But transmission service is not just about transmission repair. It’s also about transmission maintenance. It’s about taking preventive measures. As such, transmissions should be serviced regularly. To find out how regularly you should check the manufacturer’s manual for your specific vehicle and/or ask a transmission expert at Mister Transmission. Speaking generally, if you’ve driven over 100000 kilometers since you’ve last had your transmission serviced, you should bring it into a Mister Transmission shop.

Is Transmission Service Necessary?

Yes, absolutely. It may not be necessary right now for your transmission, but it will be eventually. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, as the old saying goes, so why procrastinate? Transmissions need regular service and maintenance if they are to have a long life. They are simply too important and too intricate –there is so much that can go wrong with all of the different components within a transmission– that you can’t just leave transmissions alone and hope for the best.

How Do You Service Your Transmission?

There are certain things you can do at home to service your transmission. The most obvious is checking your transmission fluid. But now more and more vehicles do not have a dipstick, check it every month if you can and if your levels are low, top them up. If you find yourself topping up your fluid something is wrong. Bring it in for service. Also, look at the fluid and give it a whiff. Transmission fluid should be translucent with a reddish hue and a neutral smell.

But there are limits to what you can do, especially in this age of computerized vehicles. For example, there’s no way you could do something like Mister Transmission’s free Multi-Check Inspection yourself.

Mister Transmission

If you would like to learn more about transmission service, please contact us.

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What Are The Symptoms Of A Bad Torque Converter?

What Are The Symptoms Of A Bad Torque Converter?

The torque converter is a key component of your automobile. It needs to be working properly if you’re going to have a smooth ride. If it’s not working, you’re in trouble. The torque converter is a type of fluid coupling (also known as a hydraulic coupling) that transfers rotating mechanical power generated by the engine to a rotating driven load. The torque converter is an alternative to a mechanical clutch and in a vehicle with automatic transmission it connects the power source to the load. The torque converter is usually located between the engine’s flex plate and the transmission.

Torque converters can multiply torque. Simple fluid coupling can match rotational speed but cannot multiply torque, so using a torque converter allows for more power. Some torque converters are also equipped with a “lockup” mechanism which rigidly binds the engine to the transmission when their speeds are nearly equal in order to avoid slippage and a resulting loss of efficiency. In short, the torque converter is important. So how do you know if you have a bad one?

What Happens When A Torque Converter Goes Bad?

How can you know if you have a bad torque converter? What are the symptoms of a bad torque converter? Well, if your transmission has been slipping out of gear, this could be a symptom of a bad torque converter. This typically happens when you switch gears and your transmission slips into neutral of its own accord. Moreover, sounds such as shuddering, clunking, whirring, and humming are rarely good news. These could all be signs that something is amiss with your torque converter.

Your transmission tends to get hot, but heat is also the enemy of transmissions. Overheating is a problem that affects many transmissions and this can be caused by a faulty torque converter. High stall speeds are also a symptom of a bad torque converter. The trouble with all of these symptoms, though, is that there could be something wrong with your torque converter long before you notice any of them. That’s why monthly transmission fluid checks are crucial to maintaining a healthy transmission. Dirty transmission fluid –that is opaque or foul-smelling transmission fluid– can be a symptom of a bad torque converter.

What Causes Torque Converter Failure?

But what are some of the causes of all the aforementioned symptoms of a bad torque converter? Many problems can be caused by excessive friction which is usually a sign that a torque converter’s needle bearings have become damaged. Faulty seals are also a prime suspect; they allow fluid to leak and become contaminated. Faulty clutch solenoids are also common causes of torque converter failures.

Can A Bad Torque Converter Damage A Transmission?

Yes, absolutely. Bad torque converters can cause overheating, friction damage, and transmission fluid degradation. The longer these problems continue, the more damaged your transmission will get.

Does A Torque Converter Come With A Transmission?

Yes. Provided it’s an automatic transmission. Your transmission won’t be able to transfer power from the engine to the axles without a torque converter. In a manual transmission, the equivalent is the mechanical clutch. Sometimes a torque converter has to be replaced independent of the transmission.

Mister Transmission

To learn more about torque converters, please contact us.

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What is the Torque Converter and Why is It Causing Me So Many Problems?

What is the Torque Converter and Why is It Causing Me So Many Problems?

If you’ve done any cursory research on transmissions and how they work you may have come across the torque converter. Indeed, if you’ve ever looked up common transmission problems, you will no doubt have seen the torque converter mentioned. What is this mystery component of the transmission? And why is it causing you so many gosh darn problems?

The Torque Converter

The torque converter is a type of fluid coupling. What is a fluid coupling? A fluid coupling, also known as a hydraulic coupling, is a device used to transmit rotating mechanical power. It is an alternative to a mechanical clutch. So, the torque converter is one of these and it transfers rotating power generated by the engine to a rotating driven load. In an automatic transmission vehicle, the torque converter connects the power source to the load. The torque converter is typically located between the engine’s flexplate and the transmission. For a manual transmission vehicle, the equivalent component would be the mechanical clutch.

The main characteristic of a torque converter is its ability to multiply torque. This is key. Simple fluid coupling can match rotational speed but cannot multiply torque. As a result, using a torque converter allows for more power. Some torque converters are also equipped with a “lockup” mechanism. A lockup rigidly binds the engine to the transmission when their speeds are nearly equal in order to avoid slippage and a resulting loss of efficiency.

Torque Converter Problems

The torque converter can be involved in a lot of transmission problems. It’s not that these devices are poorly designed, they’re just so integral to the function of the transmission that if something goes wrong, it is probably affected. As an illustration of this, it is standard procedure to replace the torque converter in transmission overhauls. Transmission overhauls, which are also known as transmission rebuilds, involve removing the transmission from the chassis, taking it apart piece by piece, inspecting every piece, cleaning the ones that are still good and replacing the damaged ones. But good technicians don’t take chances on torque converters, they just replace them.

Symptoms Of Torque Converter Problems

Torque converters aren’t always the cause of your transmission problems. In fact, they’re rarely the cause. But they are almost always affected by any problem that your transmission does have. The takeaway from all this: torque converter problems rarely occur in isolation. If you have a problem with your torque converter, you probably have a problem with your transmission more broadly, and should bring your vehicle into a transmission shop for inspection. But how can you know if you have an issue with your torque converter? Well, some of the symptoms of torque converter problems are:

  • Overheating
  • Slipping
  • Shuddering
  • Dirty transmission fluid
  • High stall speeds
  • Strange noises, such as humming, whirring, or clunking

Mister Transmission

At Mister Transmission we have replaced hundreds, if not thousands, of torque converters and we can replace yours too, if necessary. Not sure if your torque converter is the problem? Don’t worry, our Mister Transmission Multi-Check Inspection is bound to find out if there is a problem with your torque converter or any other part of your transmission. To learn more about torque converters or our services, please contact us.

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Is a Special Service Required for Dodge Transmissions?

Is a Special Service Required for Dodge Transmissions?There are two types of motorists out there: those that don’t give a second thought to what kind of transmission is in their model of vehicle, and those that spend hours exhaustively researching every component in their vehicle or the vehicle which they are considering purchasing. With all the contradictory information available on the internet, the person who spends all the time researching might end up as confused and lost as the person who did no research. But don’t worry. We at Mister Transmission are here to help. For example, if you drive a Dodge, what do you need to know about your transmission? Do Dodge transmissions require a special service?

Dodge

Dodge is a brand of American automobile manufactured by FCA US LLC (Chrysler). It was founded in Auburn Hills, MI, by the Dodge brothers in 1900, making Dodge one of the first American automobile manufacturers. Dodge was acquired by Chrysler in 1928 and some of their most popular models include the Ram Pickup, the Grand Caravan, the Challenger, the Charger, and the Durango.

Dodge Automatic Transmissions

Dodge automatic transmissions use sensors to determine when they should shift gears and then changes gears accordingly by using internal transmission fluid pressure. An interesting fact is that automatic transmissions have to be momentarily disengaged from the engine internally in order to shift gears, an automatic transmission’s different speeds are attained by creating different gear ratios. The key component in this for Dodge transmissions, as with all transmissions, is the torque converter which transfers power from the engine to the transmission via “fluid coupling”. For this process to work properly, you need the full amount of automatic transmission fluid. Again, this is not unique to Dodge transmission service, but you should regularly check your transmission fluid levels.

Dodge Transmission Service

Dodge transmissions might require service for a number of reasons. However, the most common cause of failure in Dodge transmissions is a malfunctioning torque converter. Torque converters that are not functioning properly can cause shifting problems. The torque converter in a Dodge transmission (or indeed, any automatic transmission) fulfills the same role as the clutch does in a manual transmission. The torque converter controls how much fluid is passed on to the transmission and allows your engine to continue running while at a full stop.

If you suspect the torque converter in your Dodge transmission is malfunctioning, don’t delay bringing it in for a transmission service. Without a transmission service, the torque converter in your Dodge transmission will repeatedly fail for weeks, or maybe even months, but it will eventually completely break down. If this happens, the transmission fluid in your Dodge transmission can get contaminated with metal debris, which in turn might cause serious damage to your transmission. If this happens, your Dodge transmission will need a more extensive repair or even a complete rebuild.

Symptoms Of Problems With Dodge Transmissions

  • Some signs that the torque converter or any other component of your Dodge transmission requires service include:
  • Transmission slipping, grinding, or jumping during acceleration when the car is shifting gears
  • Overheating
  • Contaminated transmission fluid
  • Check Engine Light On
  • Gears changing at high RPM

Contact Us

To learn more about Dodge transmission service, or how we service any other make of transmission, please contact Mister Transmission.

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School of Transmission

Your vehicle’s automatic transmission is a remarkable piece of machinery. It may be complex to understand how it functions, but a little knowledge can go a long way toward preventing a breakdown

The most complex and intricate system in your car is its automatic transmission – understanding how it works can help save you time, hassle, and money. Comprised of a series of mechanical, hydraulic, and electrical components, they are all controlled by your car’s engine control unit, aka the powertrain control module.

A short drive to a nearby store means your transmission will likely shift about 25 to 30 times. Now imagine how many trips like that you make in a year and the impact they have on your transmission.

Shift Your Thinking about Your Automatic Transmission

Automatic transmission gear changes are monitored and executed by your vehicle’s internal computer. A torque converter uses the pressure and flow of transmission fluid to not only regulate the gear changes but also to allow the engine to continue running even when at a full stop. It also makes for a smoother shifting between gears.

When fluid levels in the transmission drop, so does the pressure that controls the shifting of gears. That can cause friction and less effective cooling, in turn leading to damage and potentially expensive repairs.

Recognizing Automatic Transmission Warning Signs

Preventing a breakdown from stranding you at the roadside requires insight into the warning signs your car will send if you’re on the cusp of experiencing a transmission-related problem. These warning signs include:

  • Grinding, rattling, or whining noises when changing gears or problems shifting gears
  • A delay in movement or your car jerks or shakes as it accelerates
  • Your transmission fluid is low, or you notice it pooling beneath the engine where you park
  • If you check your transmission fluid and see it’s not a reddish colour
  • You smell a burning odour while or after you drive

If you suspect your vehicle’s automatic transmission isn’t performing properly, or if you have questions about preventative transmission maintenance, contact us. Take advantage of our free 21-point multi-check inspection and avoid the cost and aggravation associated with a failing transmission.

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